Updates HoneyBadger v-05/05/2015 - TCP attack inquisitor and 0-day catcher.

Updates HoneyBadger v-05/05/2015 – TCP attack inquisitor and 0-day catcher.

Version May 5, 2015 :
+ all: make connection factory an interface
+ fix pcapsnifferoptions and various cleanup
+ fix description/copyright banner
+ all: gofmt -s -w
+ Refactor BadgerSupervisor into core package

HoneyBadger is a comprehensive TCP stream analysis tool for detecting and recording TCP attacks. HoneyBadger includes a variety of TCP stream injections attacks which will prove that the TCP attack detection is reliable.

project goals:
– HoneyBadger will primarily be a comprehensive TCP stream analysis tool for detecting and recording TCP attacks. Perhaps it can assist in discovering 0-days and botnets.
– HoneyBadger will include a variety of TCP stream injections attacks which will prove that the TCP attack detection is reliable.

manual “integration test” with netcat
abstract
This manual testing procedure proves that HoneyBadger’s TCP injection detection is solid! It only takes a few minutes to perform… and thus I highly recommend it to new users for two reasons
– to raise awareness about how insecure TCP is
– to give you confidence that HoneyBadger has reliable TCP attack detection functionality

TCP attack inquisitor and 0-day catcher

TCP attack inquisitor and 0-day catcher

procedure
1. build honey_badger.go and spray_injector.go (located in the tools directory in the source repository)
2. run honey_badger with these arguments… Note we are telling honey_badger to write log files to the current working directory.

3. run spray_injector with these arguments

4. start the netcat server

5. start the netcat client

6. In this next step we enter some data on the netcat server so that it will send it to the netcat client that is connected until the spray_injector prints a log message containing “packet spray sent!” In that cause the TCP connection will have been sloppily injected.

7. Look for the log files in honey_badger’s working directory. You should see two files beginning with “127.0.0.1”; the pcap file is a full packet log of that TCP connection which you can easily view in Wireshark et al. The JSON file contains attack reports. This is various peices of information relevant to each TCP injection attack. The spray_injector tends to produce several injections… and does so sloppily in regards to keeping the client and server synchronized.

It’s what you’d expect… the pcap file can be viewed and analyzed in Wireshark and other similar tools. The 127.0.0.1:9666-127.0.0.1:43716.attackreport.json file contains JSON report structures. The attack reports contains important information that is highly relevant to your interests such as:

– type of TCP injection attack
– flow of attack (meaning srcip:srcport-dstip:dstport)
– time of attack
– payload of packet with overlaping stream segment (in base64 format)
– previously assembled stream segment that overlaps with packet payload (in base64 format)
– TCP sequence of packet
– end sequence of packet
– overlap start offset is the number of bytes from the beginning of the packet payload that we have available among the reassembled stream segments for retrospective analysis
– overlap end offset is the number of bytes from the end of the packet payload that we have in our reassembled stream segments…

Sample Output :

Download : Master.Zip  | Clone Url | Our post before
Source : https://honeybadger.readthedocs.org/en/latest/ | Github